Agostino Carracci, after
Italy, 1557-1603
Venus, Vulcan, and Cupid

Engraving on laid paper
182 x 265 mm; 7 ¼ x 10 ½ inches

Unrecorded, and likely unique impression of this composition, known from Carracci’s pen drawing of the same subject in Windsor Castle. The drawing is executed using the engravers’ technique of crosshatching accompanied by dots. A simplified image, in reverse, leaving off Venus’ night table and toiletries, was engraved by Pietro del Po, probably in the 1660s (Illustrated Bartsch vol. 45, New York 1982, no. 32, p. 228).

Diane de Gracia Bohlin, in her catalogue raisonné of Prints and Related Drawings of the Carracci Family (Washington, National Gallery of Art, 1979, pp. 340-341), reproduces this Windsor drawing and associates it with Agostino’s engraving of Omnia vincit Amor.

Referring to the Windsor Castle drawing, Ms Bohlin points out, “It seems likely that Agostino intended to engrave this composition but never got around to it.”

Repaired thin spots and some unobtrusive stains, across upper background. Trimmed outside of plate, 3 mm on all sides. Thin 3mm area outside of image lower right.
Jacob Matham
Netherlands, 1571-1631
St. Catherine

1615
Engraving after Hendrik Goltzius
Bartsch 116, Hollstein 150.
Provenance: d’Arenberg, Lugt 567 Fabricius,
Lugt 919 Thomas Graf. Lugt 1092a
336 x 273 mm; 13 1/8 x 10 ¾ inches,
Trimmed 2mm outside of image on all sides.

Jacob Matham was the stepson of Hendrik Goltzius who followed in his stepfather’s footsteps beginning in 1581, by learning the art of engraving. Matham traveled to Italy in the 1590’s where he engraved works by leading artists. He returned to the Netherlands where he continued to engrave works by local artists, particularly Goltzius.
In this image, a very regal St Catherine of Alexandria of noble birth and well versed in the sciences gazes into the heavens,with her hand posed on a wheel, her attribute. In the background , we witness the story of Catherine’s martyrdom as she is about to be beheaded, after the emperor ‘s failed attempt to kill her at the wheel.
Monogrammist I. F. Fiorétin
The Wedding of Vertumnus and Pomona

1542
Engraving, possibly after Baccio Bandinelli.
With a tablet inscribed I.F. Fiorétin Orefi(ce) F(ecit).MDXLII
Lower right corner repaired.
Bartsch XV,502. Witcombe Print publishing in 16th century Rome p 101 no 107
250 x 392 mm; 9 ½ x 15 ¼ inches

In Roman mythology Vertumnus and Pomona are both divine patrons of gardens,flowers and fruit. Pomona and her attendant nymphs bring baskets and cornucopia of fruits and flowers. The ceremony takes place at the altar of a Roman temple in which Zeus with his thunderbolt appears in the background. In the niches at the right are the statues of Venus and Amor, to her left probably Apollo.

The style of the engraving displays close affinity to that of Luca Penni and other artists who decorated the Palace of Fontainebleau for King François I. This is particularly evident in the design of Vertumnus’ throne and the details of the altar before him.

A very good even impression. Center crease has broken through in areas, thin spots in corners, some wear throughout. Trimmed on or just inside border on all sides.
Jan Harmensz Muller
Netherlands, 1571-1618
Bacchus and Ceres abandon Venus

Engraving after Bartholomeus Spranger New Hollstein (Filedt Kok) 74 II of IV. With the engraved title, Sine Cerere et Bacchio friget Venus and the verses beginning, Ah Venus, extincto quid friges membra calore?..
500 x 350 mm; 19 ¾ x 13 ¾ inches

Inscription: Without Bacchus and Ceres,Venus grows cold.
The flame ignited by Cupid arouses Venus in the background as Bacchus and Ceres depart.

A very fine impression with some minor abrasion near inscription.
Giovanni Battista Piranesi
Italy, 1720-1778
View of Paestum, with the Temple of Hera I, so-called Basilica, seen from the south-west.

Behind it, the Temple of Hera II, so called Temple of Poseidon, and in the distance, the Temple of Ceres; other archeological remnant shown in the foreground. Plate 1 from the Differentes Vues de quelques restes de trois grandes edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Paestum.
Etching and engraving, 1778
Signed in the plate: Cav(aliere) Piranesi f(ecit).
Watermark: Fleur de lys in double circle, with letter B. Focillon 583.
Plate size: 475 x 675 mm; 18 ¾ x 26 ½ inches
Sheet size: 551 x 783 mm; 21 5/8 x 30 ¾ inches

The monuments which Piranesi saw and depicted here appeared to have inspired him to achieve an immediacy of image surpassing all his previous oeuvre. “There is nothing of greater dignity of composition in the whole work (Arthur Hind, Piranesi, London, 1923, pp. 19 et seq.)”

Before leaving Paestum, Goethe wrote (1787) in his Italian diary: “This is the last vision I will take with me on my way north, and perhaps the greatest.” This is most likely the unimproved view of the site as it presented itself to the poet some 10 years after the engraving (1778).
Giovanni Battista Piranesi
Italy, 1720-1778
Vue des 18 colonnes

Plate IV from the Differentes Vues de quelques restes de trois grandes edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Paestum. Temple of Poseidon and Temple of Hera, 1778
Etching and Engraving.
Focillon 586
Signed in the plate Cav(aliere) Piranesi F(ecit)
Watermark: Fleur de lys in double circle, above a large B.
Plate Size: 680 x 555 mm; 18 ¾ x 26.5 inches
Sheet size: 551 x 745 mm; 21 5/8 x 31 inches

Giovanni Battista Piranesi spent the major part of his life, as a prolific author and illustrator of the thesis that Roman art and architecture was superior to any other school, including the Greek. In the last year of his life he undertook, in the company of his son, Francesco, a trip to Paestum. The monuments he saw there appear to have inspired him to adopt a new, brilliant way to achieve an immediacy of image that surpasses all his previous oeuvre.“

John Wilton-Ely (Piranesi, Art Council of Great Britain, London, 1978, p. 121) relates that the artist was already ill with an internal malady when he set out for Paestum. Nonetheless, as in advanced age, he showed not the slightest diminution in art, both as a draftsman and as an etcher.

The Present, superb image, shows the Temple of Poseidon en face, with the so-called Basilica, now thought to be by archaeologists a temple dedicated to Hera (so-called Hera Temple II), beside it.
Jan Saenredam, 1565-1607
Hendrick Goltzius, 1558-1617
Three Paired Gods and Goddesses after Goltzius
Jupiter and Juno Seated on a Cloud
Set of three engravings all with the initials H.G and numbers 1, 2, 3
Hollstein XXIII, 57-59, Bartsch 53-55
Watermark: Coat of arms with crown and cross, below initials.
327 x 240 mm; 12 ¾ x 8 ½ inches

Brilliant impressions of “the three engravings, which symbolize the cosmos with mythological representations of the rules of the sky, sea and underworld. Although undated the prints of the gods and goddesses reflect the less capricious, nobler, calmer character of Goltzius’ post-Italian works. It is likely that Saenredams set was engraved during the last years of the 16th century – Bruce Davis, Mannerist Prints, International Style of the 16th Century, Los Angeles County Museum, 1988, no. 144.

The attribution to Jan Saenredam has recently been questioned by Jan Filed Kok (Henrik Goltzius Engraver, Nederlands Kunsthistorische Jaarbok, 41-42, p. 188 et seq) who believes that all three prints in this series were executed by Goltzius himself. “Like other autograph sheets of the (fifteen) nineties that only display the monogram, they show rather a sculptural engraving style with deeply cut shadow sections reminiscent of Pygmalion and Galatea, also notable qualitative differences compared to the prints of Saenredam of the same year.”

All have wide margins with minor surface soil outside of image, otherwise in very fine condition.
Jan Saenredam, 1565-1607
Hendrick Goltzius, 1558-1617
Three Paired Gods and Goddesses after Goltzius
Neptune and Amphitrite
Set of three engravings all with the initials H.G and numbers 1, 2, 3
Hollstein XXIII, 57-59, Bartsch 53-55
Watermark: Coat of arms with crown and cross, below initials.
327 x 240 mm; 12 ¾ x 8 ½ inches

Brilliant impressions of “the three engravings, which symbolize the cosmos with mythological representations of the rules of the sky, sea and underworld. Although undated the prints of the gods and goddesses reflect the less capricious, nobler, calmer character of Goltzius’ post-Italian works. It is likely that Saenredams set was engraved during the last years of the 16th century – Bruce Davis, Mannerist Prints, International Style of the 16th Century, Los Angeles County Museum, 1988, no. 144.

The attribution to Jan Saenredam has recently been questioned by Jan Filed Kok (Henrik Goltzius Engraver, Nederlands Kunsthistorische Jaarbok, 41-42, p. 188 et seq) who believes that all three prints in this series were executed by Goltzius himself. “Like other autograph sheets of the (fifteen) nineties that only display the monogram, they show rather a sculptural engraving style with deeply cut shadow sections reminiscent of Pygmalion and Galatea, also notable qualitative differences compared to the prints of Saenredam of the same year.”

All have wide margins with minor surface soil outside of image, otherwise in very fine condition.
Jan Saenredam, 1565-1607
Hendrick Goltzius, 1558-1617
Three Paired Gods and Goddesses after Goltzius
Pluto and Proserpine
Set of three engravings all with the initials H.G and numbers 1, 2, 3
Hollstein XXIII, 57-59, Bartsch 53-55
Watermark: Coat of arms with crown and cross, below initials.
327 x 240 mm; 12 ¾ x 8 ½ inches

Brilliant impressions of “the three engravings, which symbolize the cosmos with mythological representations of the rules of the sky, sea and underworld. Although undated the prints of the gods and goddesses reflect the less capricious, nobler, calmer character of Goltzius’ post-Italian works. It is likely that Saenredams set was engraved during the last years of the 16th century – Bruce Davis, Mannerist Prints, International Style of the 16th Century, Los Angeles County Museum, 1988, no. 144.

The attribution to Jan Saenredam has recently been questioned by Jan Filed Kok (Henrik Goltzius Engraver, Nederlands Kunsthistorische Jaarbok, 41-42, p. 188 et seq) who believes that all three prints in this series were executed by Goltzius himself. “Like other autograph sheets of the (fifteen) nineties that only display the monogram, they show rather a sculptural engraving style with deeply cut shadow sections reminiscent of Pygmalion and Galatea, also notable qualitative differences compared to the prints of Saenredam of the same year.”

All have wide margins with minor surface soil outside of image, otherwise in very fine condition.